Monday, February 24, 2020

The Redefinition of female gender roles in the 19th century and the Essay

The Redefinition of female gender roles in the 19th century and the use of Darwinism toward Political objectives - Essay Example History reveals the very fact that women had been leading an oppressive life in England as well as the rest of Europe for centuries, and their activities were confined to the four walls only. Being the reflection of the contemporary society, early nineteenth literature portrays the women busy in performing domestic chores and obligations without taking part in any political, social or economic activity. They used to go to excursions and attend balls and dinners under the supervision of family members; hence, they were not allowed to travel alone or without the prior permission of the family. The novels produced by Jane Austen, Dickens, Bronte sisters, Eliot and others depict the same male-dominated cultural scenario, where women were the direct target of discriminative behavior at the hands of male members of society. Somehow, the situation took a drastic turn during the second half of the same century, and the same Mary Evans Ann, who used to produce works under the male name George Eliot, got such courage that she started living with G. H. Lewes for more than 20 years quite as if his wife did not exist; Sarah Austin (the wife of the famous jurist), who wrote letters of such ardor and indiscretion to a visiting German prince as to invite blackmail. (Himmelfarb, 1961) The Victorian literature reveals that female writers, poets, intellectuals and artists used to feel hesitation in participating into any literary, social or political activity, for they were discouraged to get their works published. It is therefore the renowned authors and novelists including Bronte sisters, George Eliot and others had to conceal their female names while creating the pieces of literature. Though Victorian literature contained the works of female writers, but the atmosphere was not appreciable at all. The share of women community in social construction was not acknowledged, although they worked in fields, hospitals, teaching institutions and other professions at limited scale. Stil l the male domination was oppressive and tyrannical. At first, Elizabeth Cady Stanton in 19th century and Emma Goldman in the beginning of 20th century raised their voice for the women rights. However, later part of nineteenth century observed imperative changes in women’s role and responsibilities in society. It was the era when Charles Darwin presented his astounding Evolution Theory under the title â€Å"Survival of the Fittest† in his magnificent work On the Origin of Species (1859), and proved that only strong and powerful species maintained the right to survive and reproduce. Darwin vehemently argues in favor of the notion natural selection, and declares it as the law of nature. He is of the view that it is the law of nature that the favorable traits and features in species contain more probability of inheritance and transformation into next generations. (1872: 159) Renowned sociologist Herbert Spencer extended the same survival theory, called social Darwinism, a nd claimed that socially strong communities make sure headway in the world, while the financially weak people are sure to eliminate sooner or later. Nineteenth century women also got inspiration from this very notion to obtain freedom from the awkward clutches of suppression and humiliation. Thus, women’

Friday, February 7, 2020

Theory skills and intervention 2 Essay Example | Topics and Well Written Essays - 1000 words

Theory skills and intervention 2 - Essay Example veral client-centered eating disorders and political feminist theories exist that can be used to assess her condition and offer help (Culley & Bond, 2012). This paper will focus on these theories and the kind of questions that would be asked towards assisting Tina. The fundamental question to ask Tina as a counselor is whether she acknowledges that she has a problem (Culley & Bond, 2012). This will form the basis of validating her experiences as a woman through discussions of societal and cultural pressures she faces, again as a woman, in relation to perfectionism, shape and weight (Thompson, 2003). Feminist political theories emphasize on social, class, economic and power groups, which implicitly place pressure on women to be perfect. These can further be broken into power control, sexism, obedience, cultural idea and sexuality (Mottier, 2010). The case study indicates that Tina has taken to heavy makeup and even changing the color of her hair to match that of the woman that her boyfriend fell for. This is a strong indication that she does not see herself through her own eyes, but those of the new girlfriend. This is the strongest evidence that feminist political theories are pressuring women to be something for someone else by making themsel ves their best, albeit through looks to an extent that enough attention is not paid to them as they age (Hill & Buss, 2006). These discussions will explain the situation to Tina in the event that she does not acknowledge that she has a problem. Most significantly, she must be made aware that it was not necessarily her mistake that her boyfriend chose another girlfriend. Trying to acquire the looks of the new girlfriend was a very dangerous pointer, because it means that she does not really know the true meaning of love, which she thinks to be aesthetic. The next question would be centered on whether she is willing to undergo a healing procedure, which will involve numerous counseling sessions (Gibson, Swartz & Sandenbergh,

Wednesday, January 29, 2020

Displays the result Essay Example for Free

Displays the result Essay To improve legibility the comments are displayed to the right of every TOM line of code, and not in the standard style. read keyin Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location keyin load keyin Loads data from the store location keyin in to the accumulator sub minus Subtracts the store location minus from the accumulator store display Stores value in accumulator in the store location display print display Displays contents of the store location display on the screen stop Stops program execution minus data. 1 Initialises a store location minus with the value 1 in it keyin data 0 Initialises a store location keyin with the value 0 in it display data 0 Initialises a store location display with the value 0 in it 2. Write a TOM program that reads a number from the keyboard, multiplies it by 2, reads another number b from the keyboard, multiplies it by 3, and then displays the result. In other words, evaluate 2*a+3*b. read keyin1 Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location keyin1 load keyin1 Loads data from the store location keyin1 in to the accumulator mult val1 Multiplies the accumulator by the store location val1 store display Stores value in accumulator in the store location display read keyin2. Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location keyin2 load keyin2 Loads data from the store location keyin2 in to the accumulator mult val2 Multiplies the accumulator by the store location val2 add display Adds the store location display to the accumulator store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen stop Stops program execution val1 data 2 Initialises a store location val1 with the value 2 in it val2 data. 3 Initialises a store location val2 with the value 3 in it keyin1 data 0 Initialises a store location keyin1 with the value 0 in it keyin2 data 0 Initialises a store location keyin2 with the value 0 in it display data 0 Initialises a store location display with the value 0 in it total data 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it 3. Write a TOM program that displays two numbers, entered from the keyboard, in descending numerical order. read keyin1 Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location keyin1 read keyin2. Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location keyin2 load keyin1 Loads data from the store location keyin1 in to the accumulator sub keyin2 Subtracts the store location keyin2 from the accumulator jifz lower Transfers control to the instruction lower if the zero flag is set print keyin1 Displays contents of the store location keyin1 on the screen print keyin2 Displays contents of the store location keyin2 on the screen stop Stops program execution lower print keyin2 Displays contents of the store location keyin2 on the screen print keyin1. Displays contents of the store location keyin1 on the screen stop Stops program execution keyin1 data 0 Initialises a store location keyin1 with the value 0 in it keyin2 data 0 Initialises a store location keyin2 with the value 0 in it 4. Write a TOM program that reads a number N from the keyboard and displays the sum of all integers from 1 to N i. e. 1+2+3+ +N. read keyin. Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location keyin loop load sofar Loads data from the store location sofar in to the accumulator add one Adds the store location one to the accumulator store sofar Stores value in accumulator in the store location sofar add total Adds the store location total to the accumulator store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total load sofar Loads data from the store location sofar in to the accumulator sub keyin Subtracts the store location keyin from the accumulator jifn loop. Transfers control to the instruction loop if the sign flag is set print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen stop Stops program execution keyin data 0 Initialises a store location keyin with the value 0 in it one data 1 Initialises a store location one with the value 1 in it sofar data 0 Initialises a store location sofar with the value 0 in it total data 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it Alternatively, a more mathematical approach would be to use the below program. Observing the numbers inputted and outputted from the above program, I was able to find a relationship between the two numbers, this can be summarised by the below formula: (N x 0. 5) + 0. 5 x N = TOTAL The program using the above formula is simpler to write, uses far less processor cycles, and therefore far more efficient. read keyin Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location keyin load keyin Loads data from the store location keyin in to the accumulator mult val Multiplies. the accumulator by the store location val add val Adds the store location val to the accumulator mult keyin Multiplies the accumulator by the store location keyin store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen stop Stops program execution keyin data 0 Initialises a store location keyin with the value 0 in it val data . 5 Initialises a store location val with the value 0. 5 in it total data 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it TOM2 1. A mobile telephone company, Odear, makes a monthly standing charge of i 12. 50 and charges 5 pence per local call. Write a TOM program that reads the amount of calls made and displays the total monthly bill. read calls Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location calls load calls Loads data from the store location calls in to the accumulator mult rate Multiplies the accumulator by the store location rate add standing Adds the store location standing to the accumulator store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen stop Stops program execution total data. 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it calls data 0 Initialises a store location calls with the value 0 in it standing data 12. 50 Initialises a store location standing with the value 12. 50 in it rate data . 05 Initialises a store location rate with the value . 05 in it 2. Expand your program of (1) so that the program jumps back to the beginning, ready to calculate another bill instead of ending. start read calls Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location calls load calls Loads data from the store location calls in to the accumulator mult rate. Multiplies the accumulator by the store location rate add standing Adds the store location standing to the accumulator store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen jump start Transfers control to the instruction start stop Stops program execution total data 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it calls data 0 Initialises a store location calls with the value 0 in it standing data 12. 50 Initialises a store location standing with the value 12. 50 in it rate data . 05 Initialises a store location rate with the value . 05 in it 3. Whats wrong with the program in (2)? The program has no way of ending (normally), and will therefore loop continuously. 4. Modify (2) so that if the user enters 0 for the number of units the program terminates. start read calls Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location calls load calls Loads data from the store location calls in to the accumulator sub check Subtracts the store location check from the accumulator jifz end Transfers control to the instruction end if the zero flag is set mult rate. Multiplies the accumulator by the store location rate add standing Adds the store location standing to the accumulator store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen jump start Transfers control to the instruction start end stop Stops program execution total data 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it calls data 0 Initialises a store location calls with the value 0 in it standing data 12. 50 Initialises a store location standing with the value 12. 50 in it rate data . 05 Initialises a store location rate with the value . 05 in it check data 0 Initialises a store location check with the value 0 in it 5. Now modify (4) so that the user can tell the system how many bills to calculate and the program terminates after running that many times. read billnum Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location billnum start read calls Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location calls load calls Loads data from the store location calls in to the accumulator mult rate Multiplies the accumulator by the store location rate add standing. Adds the store location standing to the accumulator store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen load billnum Loads data from the store location billnum in to the accumulator sub billsub Subtracts the store location billsub from the accumulator store billnum Stores value in accumulator in the store location billnum jifz end Transfers control to the instruction end if the zero flag is set jump start. Transfers control to the instruction start end stop Stops program execution total data 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it calls data 0 Initialises a store location calls with the value 0 in it standing data 12. 50 Initialises a store location standing with the value 12. 50 in it rate data . 05 Initialises a store location rate with the value . 05 in it billnum data 0 Initialises a store location billnum with the value 0 in it billsub data 1 Initialises a store location billsub with the value 1 in it 6. Finally, modify the program of (5) so that the user can first enter the price per unit, and the standing charge. Read rate Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location rate read standing Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location standing read billnum Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location billnum start read calls Reads data inputted by keyboard and stores in the store location calls load calls Loads data from the store location calls in to the accumulator mult rate Multiplies the accumulator by the store location rate add standing. Adds the store location standing to the accumulator store total Stores value in accumulator in the store location total print total Displays contents of the store location total on the screen load billnum Loads data from the store location billnum in to the accumulator sub billsub Subtracts the store location billsub from the accumulator store billnum Stores value in accumulator in the store location billnum jifz end Transfers control to the instruction end if the zero flag is set jump start. Transfers control to the instruction start end stop Stops program execution total data 0 Initialises a store location total with the value 0 in it calls data 0 Initialises a store location calls with the value 0 in it standing data 0 Initialises a store location standing with the value 0 in it rate data 0 Initialises a store location rate with the value 0 in it billnum data 0 Initialises a store location billnum with the value 0 in it billsub data 1 Initialises a store location billsub with the value 1 in it Modifications in TOM2 In question 1, the program initialises four store locations; rate to store the standard call rate of 0. 5, standing to store the standing charge of 12. 50, calls to store the number of calls made and total to store the total bill. The programs reads a value inputted by the user (number of calls), multiplies this value by the call rate, adds the standing order and displays it. Question 2 introduces a loop after the total has been displayed to the start of the program so that user may calculate another bill, this however is not ideal as there is no correct way to terminate the program normally. Question 4 combats this problem by allowing the user to enter 0 to terminate the program. This is done by introducing an additional store location called check with the value 0 assigned to it. The program subtracts check from the number of calls entered, if the result is 0 (0 0 = 0) then the zero flag is set, the jifz statement then transfers control to the end of the program, where it terminates normally. Question 5, in addition to the store location used in question 1 introduces two more; billnum to store the number of bills required and billsub, a store location containing the value 1. The user initially enters the number of bills required, this is stored in billnum, the program then calculates the bill in same way as question 1. After the bill has been displayed, the program subtracts billsub (1) from the number of bills, if the result is zero (ie no more bill to calculate) the zero flag is set, and using the jifz statement jumps to the end of the program. If the zero flag is not set (more bills to calculate) the program is looped back to enter more bill details. Question 6, allows the user to enter the standing charge, rate of calls and number of bills before the bills are calculated, these are stored in their respective locations (standing, rate and billnum) before the program continues to execute in the same way as question 5. CSO Tutorial 4 Exercise 2. 1 We wish to compare the performance of two different machines: M1 and M2. The following measurements have been made on these machines: Program Time on M1 Time on M2 1 10 seconds 5 seconds 2 3 seconds 4 seconds Which machine is faster for each program and by how much? For program 1, M2 is 5 seconds(or 100%) faster than M1. For program 2, M1 is 1 second (or 25%) faster than M2. Exercise 2. 2 Consider the two machines and programs in Exercise 2. 1. The following additional measurements were made: Program. Instructions executed on M1 Instructions executed on M2 1 200 x 106 160 x 106 Find the instruction execution rate (instructions per second) for each machine running program 1. Instructions executed = Instructions per second (instruction execution rate) time(seconds) M1 200000000 = 20000000 10 = 20 x 106 Instructions per second or 20 Million Instructions per second M2 160000000 = 32000000 5 = 32 x 106 Instructions per second or 32 Million Instructions per second Exercise 2. 3 If the clock rates of machines M1 and M2 in Ex 2. 1 are 200 MHz and 300 MHz respectively, find the clock cycles per instruction (CPI) for program 1 on both machines using the data in Ex 2. 1 2. 2. Clock rate = clock cycles per instruction (CPI) Instruction execution rate M1 200000000 = 10 clock cycles per instruction (CPI) 20000000 M2 300000000 = 9. 375 clock cycles per instruction (CPI) 32000000 Question 4 Draw a full flowchart of the final TOM program produced at the end of exercise TOM2. This should include all the instructions, loops and all the program labels in the appropriate places.

Tuesday, January 21, 2020

ecosystems :: essays research papers

Factors of Community: 1.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Interactions between the climate and topography a.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã¢â‚¬Å"Rainfall, soil, temperature† 2.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  The food and resources that grow 3.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Other specific resources necessary for a species to survive and adapt to. (Ecological niche) 4.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Species interaction 5.  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Physical disturbances, addition/removal of certain species -These factors determine population sizes of an ecosystem. -Conditions of arctic regions don’t allow many animals to live there due to the low temperature. Niches: (all relationships in which species engage in order to survive and reproduce)   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Fundamental Niche is a theoretical niche, where there are no constraints or limited resources)   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Realized Niche is the actual niche, where there are constraints on resources) Symbiosis: (â€Å"living together† Species interacting in +, -, and = ways) Mutualism (++)   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Both species in interaction benefit   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Obligatory Mutualism -One species cannot grow/reproduce without another species   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  EX. Yucca plants are only pollinated by Yucca moths.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Yucca moths only grow in the yucca plant and only eat Yucca seeds. Co-evolution   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -The prey and predator build better defenses and counters to the other’s abilities.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Since the best of the prey/predator survive more often, they have more chance to reproduce.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Soon only the strong survive, thus, the best ways of countering reach the entire population.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -EX. Camouflage, Mimicry (faking a characteristic), Spewing toxins, showing teeth, etc Carrying Capacity   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Maximum number of individuals that resources of environment can maintain.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Predator-Prey populations can fluctuate.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Predators may not adjust quickly enough to the abundance of prey.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Additional predators could also influence the rate.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -As more predators reproduce and eat more prey, the prey population decreases.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -As more prey dies, predators have less to eat and begin to die off.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -With fewer predators, the prey once again starts to reproduce at a faster pace. Predator- Animals that feed on living organisms, but do not live on them Prey- targets of predators that are killed Parasites- Feeds on tissues of living organisms and live on them Host- the organism a parasite feeds on Effects of Parasites   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Feeds off the host’s tissue’s nutrition.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Alters how much energy enters the organism, and weakens it.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Can alter birth rates, can sterilize, or make organisms less attractive to mates.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Can open prey to diseases and infections.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Usually does not want to cause death, so that it can reproduce for a longer period of time Microparasites   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Rapid reproducers and personally infect the body.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  EX. Bacteria, Viruses, Protozoan Macroparasites   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Directly lay their eggs on the host.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  EX. Fleas, ticks, mites, lice Social Parasites   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Manipulate the social behavior of another species.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  EX. Cuckoos lay their eggs in nests of other species, which push the rightful eggs out.   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -The mother of the original eggs ends up feeding the cuckoos. Parasitoids   Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  Ã‚  -Insect larvae that always kill what they eat (larvae and pupae of other insects)

Monday, January 13, 2020

Lord of the Flies Essay

Throughout literature we have seen different characters struggling with their inner evil. That inner evil can be brought out by a trigger incident or environment which drastically affects a character’s nature. In the Lord of the Flies, being marooned on the island brings out the evil and savage side in the children. It is shown through their disregard for social norms, merciless killings, and lastly turning on each other. In Lord of the Flies, the boys let out their inner beasts by showing no regard for social norms, remorseless killings and turning on each other. At the beginning of the novel they did not lose sight of social norms. As they find that they are alone on the island, no adults anywhere, they realize the importance of democracy and order in a place where there are no rules. â€Å"I agree with Ralph. We’ve got to have rules and obey them after all, we’re not savages†¦ † (Golding, 47) This statement is said by Jack, who is addressing the crowd of boys during an assembly. This statement shows that in the beginning before any talk of a â€Å"beastie†, they understood that they needed some order, some form of government that would provide them with safety and tools for survival. Jack’s words later prove ironic because he is the one to disobey Ralph and turn his back on the rules. By ignoring the rules and their government, he leaves the civilized tribe to form a tribe with the demented rules of the wild. As the story unfolds, they slowly move away from their government. â€Å"You see Ralph your conch doesn’t work on this side of the island† (Golding, 195). The symbol of their democracy is the â€Å"talisman, the fragile, shining beauty of the shell. † (Golding, 200) It was used to call together the boys to hold an assembly to discuss the troubling issues being made clear by Jack’s hunters. When Jack says this, he proved that the hold of democracy is fading away as they became more savage. Toward the end of the novel, the democracy is destroyed and nonexistent, and the conch is shattered. â€Å"The conch exploded into a thousand white fragments and ceased to exist† (Golding, 200). This moment is very symbolic because it represents the downfall of any sort of order among the children. Without any form of government the laws that had once applied in their homeland, England, have no power on the island, and in turn lead to the boys encountering their inner evils by ignoring those laws. During the book we see that they develop a fascination and desire with blood and hunting which later lead to shameless killings. First, there is an attempt of killing a pig which drives Jack to hunt again â€Å"You cut a pig’s throat to let the blood out,† said Jack, â€Å"otherwise you can’t eat the meat. † â€Å"Why didn’t you ­? † They knew very well why he hadn’t: because of the enormity of the knife descending and cutting into living flesh; because of the unbearable blood. â€Å"I was going to,† said Jack. He was ahead of them and they could not see his face. I was choosing a place. Next time ­! †Ã¢â‚¬ ¦ Next time there would be no mercy. † (Golding, 33-34) After this encounter with the pig, Jack was obsessed with hunting and killing this pig. When Jack and the group of hunters find a sow with her piglets, they are thrilled. This time it was for more than just food, their killing of this sow was brutish and vicious. It is described â€Å"†¦ the sow staggered her way ahead of them, bleeding and mad, and the hunters followed, wedded to her in lust, excited by the long chase and the dropped blood. â€Å"The sow collapsed under them and they were heavy and fulfilled upon her. † (Golding, 149) This sow was a symbol of an innocent being killed, she was a mother. She had children to look after, and the hunters deprived the piglets of their mother. The killing of Simon was done out of fear of the beast and in the darkness of the night. â€Å"At once the crowd surged after it, poured down the rock, leapt on the beast, screamed, struck, bit, tore. There were no words, and no movements but the tearing of teeth and claws. (Golding, 168) The imagery used in this chapter is that of an animal, by using teeth and claws to describe how cruel this killing was, showing that they have truly becoming animal like and savage. Through this event it seems as they grow more savage they become a little more afraid and desperate. The murder of Piggy is not as violent as that of the sow and Simon. â€Å"Piggy fell forty feet and landed on his back across hat square, red rock in the sea. His head opened and stuff came out and turned red. Piggy’s arms and legs twitched a bit, like a pig’s after it was killed. (Golding, 200) Piggy was killed by Roger, who was throwing rocks, which knocked him off the cliff. The savage tribe ignored what Piggy had said about choosing sides, â€Å"Which is better – to be a pack of painted [Indians] like you are, or to be sensible like Ralph is†¦. Which is better – to have laws and agree, or to hunt and kill? † (Golding, 199) By Piggy saying this, it got Roger upset, because he had critized his chief and their tribe. When Roger was a part of the civilized tribe, he conditioned his arm to shoot and miss â€Å"Yet there was a space round Henry, perhaps six yards in diameter, into which he [Roger] dare not throw. Here, invisible yet strong, was the taboo of the old life†¦ Roger’s arm was conditioned by a civilization that knew nothing of him and was in ruins. † (Golding, 67) As he became more savage, he had lost the conditioning and the restraint he once had to hurting someone, which is shown through his actions. They were fearful, ignorant, and desperate and with that comes violence, they felt no remorse for their actions only pride and hatred. This also proved that through killing they let out their inner beast. In the beginning, they are not physically turning on each other, they used verbal abuse to belittle those who are younger or had no power. There are three groups of people who are frequently abused, the â€Å"littluns†, Piggy and Simon. Piggy was the major victim, Jack and the rest of the children would frequently name call him, tease him and laugh at him. â€Å"Oh, shut up! † â€Å"I got the conch,† said Piggy, in a hurt voice. â€Å"I got the right to speak† (Golding, 49) they found him amusing, for they felt he spoke of nonsense. Jack, as chief, decided to tie up Wilfred and beat him. â€Å"He’s going to beat Wilfred. † â€Å"What for? † â€Å"†¦ I don’t know. He didn’t say. He got angry and made us tie Wilfred up. He’s been†-he giggled excitedly-â€Å"he’s been tied for hours, waiting-. † For no apparent reason, Jack wanted to torture Wilfred, maybe to reassert himself as chief and gain more followers. The last example of turning on each other in Lord of the Flies is the burning of the jungle to trap and kill Ralph. â€Å"He swerved as a spear flew past and then was silent, running. All at once the lights flickering ahead of him merged together, the roar of the forest rose to thunder and a tall bush directly in his path burst into a fan-shaped flame. † (Golding, 220)In order to capture Ralph, Jack set the jungle alight to draw him out, and kill him. This is also an example of their want to hunt and kill, and in order to be rid of order and civilization Jack had to kill Ralph, but he had not succeed. In order to have peace among the children, they all needed to be supportive and understanding, but they were cruel and hurtful to each other. This proves that thought their consequential actions, that were both cruel and unusual, turning on one another allowed the children act savage and unleash their inner evil. In the novel Lord of the Flies the children discover their inner evil by forgetting social norms, senseless and remorseless killings and lastly by turning on each other. Thought a series of events the children show these qualities that prove once and for all that all people, young and old have the ability to be savage and evil. In this particular novel, these boys encounter their inner evil by the influence of fear, ignorance, and desperation.

Sunday, January 5, 2020

The Negative Effects Of The Legalization Of Prostitution

Shea Pedro May 9, 2016 ENG2D1-06 Mrs. Galati The Negative Effects of the Legalization of Prostitution in Canada Prostitution is an excuse for someone to degrade someone else s body and exploit them. In the alleged business of prostitution, a man usually pays a women in exchange for sex. By legalizing prostitution and taking away the legal barriers, the morals and principles of people are challenged. Therefore many people may believe it is acceptable to take advantage of vulnerable women in exchange for money, treating them like sexual merchandise. Most women involved in prostitution regret their decision of their involvement but have no way of leaving. A continuous supply of trauma and abuse victims is what the industry of prostitution thrives and is dependant upon. Women involved in prostitution are constantly being put at risk for violence, robbery, sexually transmitted diseases, and unplanned pregnancy. Prostitution should not be legalized in Canada because it will increase child prostitution, expand the commercial sex industry and human trafficking, and compromise the safety of prostitute s. Firstly, by legalizing prostitution in Canada the safety of children will be put at risk. The industry would expand, and to meet demands of the clients, procurers would have to recruit more children and women. In Canada, 10 to 12 percent of all prostitutes are children (Lambrick, Melanie, Renneboog par. 1). There are children that are selling their bodies in Canada just to survive.Show MoreRelatedDiscussing The Legalization Of Prostitution1604 Words   |  7 PagesSOC 3561 04/19/2015 Discussing the Legalization of Prostitution To better discuss the legalization of prostitution there’s a need to know its definition. Legalization of prostitution is where prostitution becomes controlled by the government and becomes legal under specific conditions. 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BecauseRead MoreLegalizing Prostitution : The Pornography Industry Essay1032 Words   |  5 PagesLegalizing prostitution will expand the pornography industry. First of all, prostitution and pornography has the relationship in the sex industry activity. This relationship will share the same three factors: a seller (pimp/producer/manager), a person being sold (prostitute/porn actress/stripper) and a buyer (john/porn viewer/club patron). So what kind of relationship between pornography and prostitution? Has it to be the cause and effect relationship? It s impossible to say definitively that watchingRead MoreProstitution And Its Effect On Public Health Essay1495 Words   |  6 PagesProstitution is defined as â€Å"the practice or occupation of engaging in sexual activity with someone for payment.† It is commonly referred to in the media and among society as the â€Å"oldest profession in the book†. 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Friday, December 27, 2019

Accelerated Science Program Helps Adult Students Find Healthcare Jobs Faster

The older we get, the more aware we become of time remaining. We tend to become more efficient because there is less time to waste, less time to spend doing something we either a) dont want to do, or b) are capable of doing faster. If youre in the medical field, or want to be, and the above sounds like you, the Integrated Science Program (ISP) from Lifelong Learning Institute might be right for you. In a nutshell, the program focuses on one science for a full month, and then moves on to the next subject. So rather than taking four subjects at the same time for a full semester, you immerse yourself in just one subject--focused attention on one topic. At Southern California University of Health Sciences (SCU), for example, the ISP format involves face-to-face, full-day classroom time on Saturdays and Sundays, web-based learning from home during the week, and weekly tests. Its designed especially for adult students who work. With this format, theyre able to attend classes on weekends and fit the self-study portion of the class, which includes online discussion forums, into their lives whenever they can on weekdays. At SCU, the following courses are available in the ISP format: Biochemistry LabChemistry for Allied Health Professionals (Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry combined) Lab)General Chemistry 1 2 LabHuman Anatomy and Physiology 1 2 LabHuman Biology 1 2 LabMicrobiology LabOrganic Chemistry 1 2 LabPhysics 1 2 Lab Most ISP students at SCU are working toward completing science prerequisites for health science degrees for use in the following careers: ChiropracticDentistry and Dental HygieneMedicineNursing (LPN, LVN, CNA, ADN, RN, BSN, MS, PhD)OptometryOsteopathic MedicinePharmacyPhysician AssistantPhysical TherapyPodiatric MedicineVeterinary Medicine The ISP brochure from SCU states: Immersion learning enables ISP students to easily remember the earliest lessons of the curriculum throughout the entire duration of the course. ISP students report that never before have they grasped and retained the concepts of basic sciences so completely. The accelerated format is equal to the same credit hours as traditional semester-long programs, providing nontraditional students with one more option for fitting school into their already busy lives. If youre unsure about whether or not this kind of program is right for you, plan to attend one of the monthly open houses held on Saturdays in both Los Angeles and San Francisco. Youll also find the FAQ page helpful in answering questions you have, and theres a webinar you can take that explains everything about the Integrated Science Program, including how to apply. Testimonials are also helpful when youre trying to decide on an unconventional form of study. Be sure to read what other students have said about their success with the program. Allen Grove, Abouts Expert on College Admissions, has a nice profile on Southern California University, including info about the test scores youll need to get in, the number of applicants generally accepted, enrollment numbers, costs, financial aid available, most popular majors, transfer, graduation, and retention rates, and the schools mission statement. Thats a whole lot of info in one spot. Related science topics at About.com: BiologyChemistryHealthMathematicsPhysics